aromatherapy recipes

How to preserve shea body butter

by Lulu
(Ibiza)

I just made some Shea Body Butter using almond oil, a little coconut oil and lavender essential oil. Its turned out really well but I have lots more than expected. I am storing it in normal glass jars with screw tops. Where's the best place to keep the ones I'm not using? In a cool, dark place, in the fridge in the freezer? And how long should it keep for?

Comments for How to preserve shea body butter

Click here to add your own comments

Preserving Body Butter NEW
by: Anonymous

I use Polysirbate 20 and Optiohen all in small amounts, no water and keep extra filled jars in the refrigerator and sterilize my containers before filling them and fill the jars with the butter when it's still cold not warm or hot. I also use arrowroot to decrease the oily feeling. The last batch I accidently added too much glycerine and had to use a large amount of arrowroot.

Try using anti-bacterial like Melaleuca (tea tree) NEW
by: natahoa

I have just started making body butter so have no long-term experience, however, I make sure EVERYTHING I use is cleaned with rubbing alcohol (including utensils). The online advice I have found is that generally, body butters will NOT go rancid over time, but I think sterlizing the bowls, tools, etc. is important to ensure this.

Then I add melaleuca (tea tree) oil to every batch before letting it set/cool or adding aroma oils. This oil is HIGHLY anti-bacterial (great for yeast infections, for example). I get my melaleuca from Melaleuca, a US company that grows it's own trees and over the years has been able to greatly reduce the alkalinity of the oil, so it doesn't burn the skin) unlike "normal" melaleuca oil. This company makes a variety of cleaning and personal-care items. Their oil is very expensive and high-quality.

I also use beeswax in my body butter, which allows you to adjust the hardness of the butter. The more beeswax, the harder the butter. Beeswax also has anti-bacterial properties.

I DO add water ... I have read this is important to providing moisture to the skin. Adding a SMALL amount of water (I use purified Reverse Osmosis water) also GREATLY brightens/whitens the mix. I LOVE that clean white appearance to the butter (otherwise it tends to be yellowish).

I also seal the containers while the butter is still warm so no airborne bacteria can get established. I plan to have some of this body butter for a long time and do not plan to refrigerate it (it would be hard as a rock). Wish me well!

Try using anti-bacterial like Melaleuca (tea tree) NEW
by: natahoa

I have just started making body butter so have no long-term experience, however, I make sure EVERYTHING I use is cleaned with rubbing alcohol (including utensils). The online advice I have found is that generally, body butters will NOT go rancid over time, but I think sterlizing the bowls, tools, etc. is important to ensure this.

Then I add melaleuca (tea tree) oil to every batch before letting it set/cool or adding aroma oils. This oil is HIGHLY anti-bacterial (great for yeast infections, for example). I get my melaleuca from Melaleuca, a US company that grows it's own trees and over the years has been able to greatly reduce the alkalinity of the oil, so it doesn't burn the skin) unlike "normal" melaleuca oil. This company makes a variety of cleaning and personal-care items. Their oil is very expensive and high-quality.

I also use beeswax in my body butter, which allows you to adjust the hardness of the butter. The more beeswax, the harder the butter. Beeswax also has anti-bacterial properties.

I DO add water ... I have read this is important to providing moisture to the skin. Adding a SMALL amount of water (I use purified Reverse Osmosis water) also GREATLY brightens/whitens the mix. I LOVE that clean white appearance to the butter (otherwise it tends to be yellowish).

I also seal the containers while the butter is still warm so no airborne bacteria can get established. I plan to have some of this body butter for a long time and do not plan to refrigerate it (it would be hard as a rock). Wish me well!

preserving shea body butter NEW
by: Anonymous

I have been making shea body butter for sometime now and i use optiphen to keep my butters from growing bacteria and going rancid.

preservative NEW
by: Jess

Ok i had this same question/problem in the past and all i know is that if their is no water added to your product that you don't have to worry that your product is going to go rancid at least for a while if stored in a cool dark space. Here is a link on a article on this.Hope this helps.

http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/lotion/talk-it-out-tuesday-preservatives/

Re how to preserve shea butter NEW
by: Anonymous

Storing it in the fridge or just in a cabinet should be just fine

preserve shea butter NEW
by: Lisa

Hi, i would also like to know about this, so hopefully someyone will take the time to help us out with this!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Body Butter Q and A.


aromatherapy recipes rss
?] Subscribe to
This Site's Feed

XML RSS
Google RSS button
My Yahoo! RSS button
My MSN RSS button
Bloglines RSS button



SEARCH BY INGREDIENT, RECIPE OR PROBLEM


All information, commentary, tips and other postings are for information and entertainment purposes only.
Use of this website constitutes acceptance of Easy-Aromatherapy-Recipes.com's disclaimer, privacy policy and advertising policy.

copyright© 2009 - 2013 by Kyley Zimmerman, easy-aromatherapy-recipes.com